Sunday, 22 November 2015

(5) Five Tips to Driving Safely and Considerately



Yesterday while I was at work I came perilously close to driving over the back of a small car that decided to cut in front of me .


Now, I'm a pretty good driver, and I could see this person was about to cut in front of me, so no incident occurred.


However, It did prompt me to want to write about it and share some insights with you.


I'm a professional driver. So, I'm on the road allot.


As a means to make ends meet and help support my family I drive buses for a private school in our district.  (It has to be one of the best jobs I have ever had).


Now, as a professional, I have a set of standard that I like to work by.  Not least of which is to ensure my passengers and my vehicle are returned back to school in the same condition they left in.


This means, absolutely no road incidents/accidents.


These days, however, it is becoming increasingly difficult to keep up my end of this “agreement” I have with myself.


I feel that things are getting worse not better.  

Indeed, I worry that it is only a matter of time before I AM involved in some form of motor vehicle incident.  

Though I will do my darnedest to avoid it.


Why do I think it's a matter of time?


Well, let me explain.





When you sit up in a bus or truck you get a completely different perspective of traffic flow and driver behaviour.  

In a car you are low to the ground (even in 4x4’s) in comparison.  And because you are at the same level as all the other drivers you can’t see the dynamics quite the same way as you can when you are up high.

Although it’s pretty hard to miss some of the poor driving no matter what vehicle you are in.


So, from my elevated vantage point I get to see much farther afield that the driver of a car/SUV.

Now, in only the last two years, I have seen an increase in erratic behaviour and road rage, as well as distinct decrease in courtesy and common road safety awareness.


We  have a range of issues on our roads, some rare but some we all have experienced at one point in time.  

I am going to address the common ones here:




  1. USE YOUR INDICATORS.  


It’s why they are in your car. 


It is incredibly dangerous and arrogant to drive without letting other vehicles and pedestrians know what your intentions are.  


Not to mention if you are trying to change lanes how am I supposed to know to let you in if you aren't indicating first.  


Not rocket science people.


  1. INDICATE CORRECTLY AT ROUNDABOUTS.


Yes you do have to indicate at a roundabout.  


You can see the correct method here:


ra-signal1.gif    ra-signal2.gif



  1. DO NOT DART IN FRONT OF HEAVY VEHICLES.  


The space they leave in front of them is not for you.


It is a safety buffer.  

Indicate your intention; WAIT; give them time to see your intentions; let them ease back; then move across leaving plenty of space for you and the heavy vehicle to still maintain a safety buffer.



  1. CYCLISTS NEED TO CONSIDER OTHER ROAD USERS TOO.  


As much as vehicles need to look out for you.  People need to take responsibility for their own safety.


So show some respect and don’t hog the road.  


Use the pathways if they are there.  


I see so many cyclist on the road and directly adjacent there is a good quality cycle way.  


  1. MERGE


Three things here;  


  1. WA have new rules for merging on Free-ways:


Merging trials two lanes top view_high res.RCN-14^2F2580^231.JPG


  1. On regular roads the vehicle with the nose in front should be given right of way, the vehicle slightly behind should not try to rush up and push in, which is RUDE & ARROGANT.

regular merge.png


  1. Think zipper teeth: 
One after the other in a nice systematic manner.  Once again; Not Rocket Science.



Until next time, Don't let this be you:




Stay safe.

Robyn